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Social Justice: Racial Diversity

This guide was compiled as an introduction to resources on the topics of (1) racial disparity, (2) racial diversity, (3) implicit bias & microaggression, (4) cultural sensitivity, & (5) protests.

Racial Diversity

Racial diversity is the acknowledgement and celebration of difference between racial groups. Diversity recognizes and values differences within as well as between racial identities, noting the intersectionality of many groups including "ethnicity, gender...age, national origin, religion, disability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, education, marital status, language, and physical appearance. It also involves different ideas, perspectives, and values" (Source: Racial Equity Tools Glossary).  This section focuses on sharing resources that provide perspectives and guidance on issues of diversity and inclusion.


Table of Contents: Racial Diversity Section

Books

Articles

Databases

Organizations

Websites

Blogs

Videos


 

Books (available at HUSL Library)

Articles

Organizations

  • National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)
    Founded in 1909, the NAACP is the largest civil rights organization in the U.S. Their vision is to “ensure a society in which all individuals have equal rights without discrimination based on race."
  • Commission on Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Profession, American Bar Association (ABA)
    "The mission of the ABA Commission on Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Profession (The Commission) is to serve as a catalyst promoting diversity and inclusion within the legal profession and the ABA by facilitating the entry, participation and retention of diverse lawyers. The Commission achieves this by furthering the development of substantive programs and services in which diverse lawyers, law firms and law students will actively participate."
  • Diversity and Inclusion Center, American Bar Association (ABA)
    The ABA Diversity and Inclusion Center advances Goal III of the ABA: “to eliminate bias and enhance diversity and inclusion throughout the Association, legal profession, and justice system” by sharing educational and actionable resources.
  • National Bar Association 
    The National Bar Association was founded in 1925 and is the nation's oldest and largest national network of predominantly African-American attorneys and judges. It represents the interests of approximately 65,000 lawyers, judges, law professors and law students.” Member of the Coalition of Bar Associations of Color (CBAC) established in 1992.
  • Hispanic National Bar Association
    The Hispanic National Bar Association is “a nonprofit, nonpartisan, national membership organization that represents the interests of Hispanic legal professionals in the United States and its territories.”  Member of the Coalition of Bar Associations of Color (CBAC) established in 1992.
  • National Asian Pacific American Bar Association
    The National Asian Pacific American Bar Association is “the preeminent professional development organization and voice for 50,000 Asian Pacific American attorneys, judges, law professors, and law students. NAPABA represents the interests of nearly 90 national, state, and local Asian Pacific American bar associations.”  Member of the Coalition of Bar Associations of Color (CBAC) established in 1992.
  • National Native American Bar Association
    The National Native American Bar Association “shares many of the same goals of diversity and increased understanding of our communities’ unique cultural and legal issues with minority bar associations. However, most of our lawyers are both U.S. citizens and citizens of their respective Tribal nations. Our members, therefore, also share the communal responsibility, either directly or indirectly, of protecting the governmental sovereignty of the more than 560 independent Native American Tribal governments in the United States.” Member of the Coalition of Bar Associations of Color (CBAC) established in 1992.

Websites

Blogs

  • Diverse Issues in Higher Education - African Americans
    This blog focuses on issues in higher education from the African American perspective. 
  • RIPS Law Librarian Blog
    Research, Instruction, and Patron Services Special Interest Section (RIPS-SIS) of the American Association of Law Libraries’ blog. This blog features numerous posts by various authors on diversity and inclusion in law libraries.
  • At the Intersection
    This blog is the work of April Hathcock, and purports to be “about the intersection of libraries, law, feminism, and diversity.
  • Race and the Law Prof Blog
    A member of the Law Professors Blog Network, this blog is written by law professors and focuses on issues of race and legal issues.
  • Feminist Law Professors
    This blog includes contributions from law professors nationwide and entries focus on feminism in law including feminist legal scholarship, LGBTQ rights, and employment discrimination.

Videos

Ibram X. Kendi, The Difference Between Being "Not Racist" and Antiracist, TED (2020)
"There is no such thing as being "not racist," says author and historian Ibram X. Kendi.” In this 51-minute video, Kendi “defines the transformative concept of antiracism to help us more clearly recognize, take responsibility for and reject prejudices in our public policies, workplaces and personal beliefs. Learn how you can actively use this awareness to uproot injustice and inequality in the world -- and replace it with love."


 

LC Johnson, Women of Color Could Save the World. Here's How We Help Them Do it., TEDxColumbus (2019)
In this 14-minute video LC Johnson discusses the effects of microaggressions and tokenism on creativity for women of color, and offers a solution to tap their potential.

 

 

© Howard University School of Law Library.  Questions about this guide should be directed to reference@law.howard.edu.

 

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